Defending blockchain innovation and the entire gaming community

  • The ‘131 patent seeks to secure monopoly rights over an idea that is already commonplace within the gaming community (and has been for a long time, by blockchain standards): exchanging currency for a token that can only hold value within a game. In the patent world, this is referred to as an “abstract idea,” something that is not patentable according to U.S. law and rulings of the Supreme Court. There’s a good reason for this — no one should have control over common practices or ideas, like being able to conduct basic transactions online or in a game.
  • The patent is invalid because it lacks the requisite of innovative, technological improvements and instead relies on obvious and anticipated uses of existing technologies, including blockchains and smart contracts. We believe this is why Pocketful of Quarters’ application for a comparable international patent under the Patent Cooperation Treaty was rejected.
  • The patent is unenforceable. The materials we provided to the U.S. Patent Office included materials that appear to have been improperly withheld from the Patent Office to date. Withholding information of this sort is known as “inequitable conduct,” and, legally, this alone is grounds to render unenforceable the ‘131 patent. It is critical to a fair and equitable patent system that patents applicants disclose all relevant information about prior art, so that the patent office can conduct a full and fair review

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Forte

Forte

140 Followers

Building economic technology for games using blockchain technology.